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Not One Reasonable Reason to Oppose Gorsuch

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Washington, D.C. –Today, the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee, Judge Neil Gorsuch, will draw to a close.Penny Nance, CEO & President of Concerned Women for America (CWA), the largest public policy organization for women in the country, had this to say on the performance of Judge Neil Gorsuch at his hearings to become the next justice of the U.S. Supreme Court:

“Senate Democrats have tried every way they can to show from Neil Gorsuch’s record one reason to vote against him. But they have come up empty. There is not a single reasonable reason on Judge Gorsuch’s record to vote against him.

“Now, we know many object to President Trump or Steve Bannon or the Republicans’ treatment of Judge Garland, and they will choose the unprecedented, radical position not to vote for Judge Gorsuch as a result. But, looking at his record, he comes out of now his third day of hearings unscathed.

“He has been thoughtful, poised, reasonable, independent, caring, empathetic, and humble. He has shown himself to be beyond all reasonable doubt a mainstream nominee worthy of each and every senator’s vote.

“The thousands of members of Concerned Women for America around the country that I represent are united in asking all senators to put politics aside for once and act in the best interest of our country by voting for Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation.”

For an interview with Penny Nance contact Janae Stracke [email protected] 712-269-1724.

Concerned Women Through History: National Sovereignty — Deborah, Joan of Arc, and Bev Ehlen

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There is a deep valor in standing up for one’s own nation.  Believing in a nation’s sovereignty literally means believing in the state’s right to “self-govern.”  It is the patriotism that protects one’s own nation against those who seek to oppress or destroy it.

We could, at first, think national sovereignty has more to do with men.  Men are often in governing positions; men are often the ones on the battlefield. We are told by the left that women care mostly about “women’s issues” like reproductive “freedom.”  But this worldview misses a long legacy of women who are deeply involved in their country’s governing and protection.

Deborah, the Bible’s only female judge, was so important to Israel’s history that she was known as the “Mother of Israel.” She was a judge in the land, an amazing civic responsibility, but she became concerned that the Israelite people had been so long enslaved by the king of Canaan and his army commander Sisera. Deborah knew God was calling Israel’s army, led by Barak, to come against Sisera.  She was brave enough to demand that Barak follow God’s call and brave enough to accompany him.  Yet she was humble enough to not be the head of the army herself, and to share in the victory with another woman — Jael — who slew Sisera with her tent peg!  It’s a remarkable story (read more in Judges 4 & 5) about protecting one’s nation.

Then there is Joan of Arc whose love for France led her to a battle of her own.  Born a poor shepherd girl, she felt directly called by God to defend France from English oppression.  In chapter one of his book, 7 Women, Eric Metaxas tells of the situation France faced: “It was not unusual for English soldiers to march into French villages, killing civilians, burning homes, and stealing crops and cattle.” This situation called Joan out of her comfort zone and into great acts of bravery: “Although I would rather have remained spinning at my mother’s side,” she said, “yet must I go and must I do this thing, for my Lord wills that I do so.” Her sacrifices eventually led to victory and the restoration of the King of France before her own capture and trial.  Her ultimate martyrdom speaks highly of her commitment to God and country at all costs.

Whilst Deborah was “Mother of Israel,” Joan was “The Maid of Orleans.”  Whether married or single, whether judging the laws or leading the troops, whether Israel or France, Deborah and Joan protected national sovereignty. They are an inspiration for concerned women who wish to protect America today.

In today’s world, women like Bev Ehlen protect America by educating our leaders, so that the loyalty of those leaders to America can grow against any internal or external threat.

Bev is standing up for America by working on the ground to educate individuals across Missouri regarding the Christian history and foundation of our country. Because of Bev’s work, each member of the Missouri General Assembly (MOGA) is given a copy of The Five Thousand Year Leap when they take office, which explains the twenty eight principles that the Founders used to create our republic and write our U.S. Constitution.  Bev believes that protecting America requires renewed commitment to these principles and to the governing structure of federalism where each sovereign state makes up a wonderful sovereign nation.

In what way might God be calling you to protect America today?

 

Three Takeaways from Day One of the Gorsuch Hearings

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1)    Neil Gorsuch was stupendous

Once again, Judge Neil Gorsuch showed why he is such a stellar choice for the Supreme Court.  He was graceful, poised and patient with all members and had prepared a thoughtful opening statement that captivated the audience.

Here are some excerpts:

My Mom was one of the first women graduates of the University of Colorado law school. As the first female assistant district attorney in Denver, she helped start a program to pursue deadbeat dads. And her idea of day care sometimes meant I got to spend the day wandering the halls or tagging behind police officers. She taught me that headlines are fleeting – courage lasts.

My Dad taught me that success in life has little to do with success. Kindness, he showed me, is the great virtue. He showed me too that there are few places closer to God than walking in the wilderness or wading a trout stream. Even if it is an awfully long drive home with the family dog after he encounters a skunk. …

When I put on the robe, I am also reminded that under our Constitution, it is for this body, the people’s representatives, to make new laws. For the executive to ensure those laws are faithfully enforced. And for neutral and independent judges to apply the law in the people’s disputes. If judges were just secret legislators, declaring not what the law is but what they would like it to be, the very idea of a government by the people and for the people would be at risk. And those who came to court would live in fear, never sure exactly what governs them except the judge’s will. As Alexander Hamilton explained, “Liberty can have nothing to fear from” judges who apply the law, but liberty “ha[s] every thing to fear” if judges try to legislate, too. …

As a student many years ago, I found myself walking through the Old Granary burial ground in Boston where Paul Revere, John Hancock, and many of our founders are buried. I came across the tombstone of a lawyer and judge who today is largely forgotten — as we are all destined to be soon enough. His name was Increase Sumner. Written on his tombstone over 200 years ago was this description —

As a lawyer, he was faithful and able;

as a judge, patient, impartial, and decisive;

in private life, he was affectionate and mild;

in public life, he was dignified and firm.

Party feuds were allayed by the correctness of his conduct;

calumny was silenced by the weight of his virtues,

and rancor softened by the amenity of his manners.

These words stick with me. I keep them on my desk. They serve for me as a daily reminder of the law’s integrity, that a useful life can be led in its service, of the hard work it takes, and an encouragement to good habits when I fail and falter. At the end of it all, I could hope for nothing more than to be described as he was. If confirmed, I pledge that I will do everything in my power to be that man.

2)    Democrats want to debate Donald Trump’s record, not Gorsuch’s

It started with Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-California) setting the stage, “We are here today under very unusual circumstances.”  Because “President Trump repeatedly promised to appoint someone in the mold of Justice Scalia.”  The horror!

Someone should have told her speech writer that that was one of the main reasons why President Trump won the election!  But I digress.

It continued with almost every other Democratic senator.  Here is Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minnesota):

You come before us this afternoon not only as a nominee sitting at a table with your friends and family behind you but in the context of the era in which we live. From the highest level of government, we have heard criticism of journalists. Seventeen intelligent agencies have confirmed that Russia attempted to influence our most recent election.  At the same time, voting rights …

She continued to complain about President Trump for a while, until she finally admitted, “You are not the cause of these challenges, Judge.”  Then why are you talking about that?  Have a hearing on President Trump, if you like.  But this will be a recurring theme.

A theme that will ultimately fail, but they’ll push it nonetheless.

3)    Sen. Whitehouse should be ashamed of himself 

Sure, no one but legal geeks like me pays close attention to Senate Judiciary Committee Members’ statements, but Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse’s (D- Rhode Island) opening statement should be highlighted and decried (by senators from both parties) as the worst form of partisan chicanery.

He essentially accused conservative justices (and conservative judges in general) of being bought by corporations.  You can watch his shameful statement here:

“There is no coincidence here,” he said, “Business has groups trolling for cases to get them before the friendly court. … It’s kind of a machine.  They set up and fund front groups, the front groups appear before the court, they tell the court what the special interest wants and the court follows the brief and the decision favors the special interest and they pour more money to the front groups.”

In other words, conservative justices are beholden to big businesses because they give money for them to get them elected and selected.  He even insinuated that was the case with Judge Gorsuch.  Those same groups, he told Gorsuch looking straight at him, “are spending millions of dollars in a dark money campaign to push your confirmation.”

Gorsuch is a humble, respectful man.  And frankly, almost all senators-Republican and Democrats- were at least dignified in their statements, even as they expressed some apprehension to Gorsuch’s nomination.  But not Sen. Whitehouse.

He dishonored the Senate and insulted an honorable man to score cheap political points.  He should be ashamed of what he did, and he should apologize to his Senate colleagues, the nominee, and the American people.

He, above all, should apologize to Chief Justice Roberts for whom he reserved most contempt.

Sen. Whitehouse’s conspiracy theories are typical of the most fringe groups of the radical left.  But for him to bring them into a confirmation hearing as important as this, is simply reprehensible.

Concerned Women Through History: Religious Liberty — Miriam, Anne Hutchinson, and Tanya Ditty

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Freedom.  It’s something for which every human heart longs.  That opportunity to connect with God and seek Him.  Women throughout history have taught the world something about the need for freedom.

Miriam, from the book of Exodus, helped her brother Moses lead their nation out of slavery into freedom.  Retellings of this epic story often leave out that Israel’s freedom was fundamentally tied to the Israelites need to freely worship God which they were not allowed to do in Egypt: “Then say to [Pharoah], ‘The LORD, the God of the Hebrews, has sent me to say to you: Let My people go, so that they may worship Me in the wilderness. But until now you have not listened,’” (Exodus 7:16).  Israel’s Exodus reminds us that the freedom of nations is tied to the freedom of religion; one begets the other.

And God’s people, once free from Egypt’s grasp, had to make a conscious, willful decision to follow God.  Their religious freedom allowed them to choose rightly or wrongly: “But if serving the LORD seems undesirable to you, then choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve, whether the gods your ancestors served beyond the Euphrates, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land you are living. But as for me and my household, we will serve the LORD,” (Joshua 24:15).

Likewise in America, people must choose whether to follow God, and be free and unhindered to do so according to their conscience.  In the early days of the colonies, Anne Hutchinson fought for our nation to be one founded on the principle of religious freedom, not one particular sect or denomination against others. In what would become the nation of “E Pluribus Unum (Out of Many, One),” Ann was ahead of her time in respecting conscience.  After her own specific religious beliefs lead her to part with the majority religion, she moved to Rhode Island and helped establish freedom of religion there.  She was laying the groundwork for what would become a great American value outlined in the eloquent words of the Bill of Rights: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”

And today it’s Concerned Women for America of Georgia State Director Tanya Ditty who carries on this American legacy of religious freedom. She has stood up for our fundamental right to freedom of conscience — the right to think and believe what we want without fear of punishment.  She has fought tirelessly for religious freedom legislation in Georgia that ensures broad-based religious protections for all its citizens. She had this to say about the importance of religious freedom: “It is the bedrock of all liberty, and it must be protected now for the sake of the generations that come behind us.”

Blessings for future generations are such an important concept to America.  Ask God how you can be a part of ensuring a legacy of religious freedom in America.

 

Concerned Women Through History: Education – Eunice, Septima Clark, and Jill Noble

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Eunice is one of the lesser known women of the Bible.  She’s referenced twice, once in Acts and once in Paul’s letter to Timothy.

2 Timothy 1:5 states: “I have been reminded of your sincere faith, which first lived in your grandmother Lois and in your mother Eunice and, I am persuaded, now lives in you also.” This passage helps us connect with the humanity of Paul and Timothy as they discuss common relationships and admire educational achievements.

It is Timothy’s mother, and her mother before her, who set the young leader on a good path.  We learn here that education and the family are linked.  We are reminded that spiritual maturity — learning the ways of God in our life — begins at home and extends out to an entire community.

Furthermore, we know from Acts 16:1 that Eunice was married to an unbeliever.  So she managed to raise her son in the faith, despite what could have been opposition and marital tension.  Eunice’s name means “victory.”  Indeed, Timothy’s faith was a great victory not only for Eunice, but meant great victories in the church — both historically and today.

What Eunice did for the church, Septima did for her race.  Septima Poinsette Clark’s husband died tragically shortly after their marriage, so, like Eunice, she had to forge her own advocacy.  She was African-American and spent her life making sure African-Americans received proper education and civil rights.  She was a teacher who lost her job for her desire to work in the NAACP.

And in 1961, she joined the Southern Christian Leadership Conference as director of education and teaching, helping to create over 800 schools. 

Jill Noble, the Greater Kansas City area director for Concerned Women for America, also knows education is a tool for empowerment.  In her home state of Missouri, she fought Common Core curriculums, which were putting local needs aside and reducing intelligence standards to the lowest common denominator.

Her deep passion for education comes from a deep awareness of its divine origin.  As she puts it:

“We always need to remember that it was God Himself who created the ability to transfer a grapheme symbol to represent a spoken word.  There is great power in this technology that we call ‘reading.’  It was designed from the beginning to educate God’s people out of slavery into a holy nation. We saw that in the giving of the Ten Commandments and, ultimately, in the giving of the entire Word of God.  It was and is entirely designed to educate the human race in all areas of life.  Today, education is under assault in large part because liberal policies cannot easily control an educated population.  And so we continue to educate our children and ourselves in order to uphold the precepts of God, as well as the Constitution of the United States of America.”

These women understand the reverberating effects of education — on a church, for a race, and in a nation. We admire them as heroines who know the next generation needs our care.

 

Concerned Women Through History: Family — Ruth, Abigail Adams, and Kari Zeier

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Ruth.  She was a Moabite — a nation that only existed because of the rape and incest of Lot’s daughters with their father.  Thus there was political hostility between her race and Israel.  And in her personal life, she’d already been through so much.  Her father-in-law had died.  Her husband had died.  Her first marriage had been infertile.

Looking at this, it is hard to believe she was destined to be the family woman of the Bible!

But she is.  She stuck by Naomi — her mother-in-law, a woman of a different race, age, and religion — knitting herself to her with fierce commitment.  Giving up her homeland’s gods, she embraced Judaism.  She bravely gleaned food for her and her mother-in-law and humbly accepted Boaz’s help and protection, while boldly reminding him of his further duties as her kinsman redeemer and eventually becoming his wife.  And she bore the grandfather of David, in the very lineage of Christ.

Then there is Abigail Adams.  In many ways, she was the woman behind American independence.  Farmer, supportive wife, community organizer, and fiercely faithful to God, Abigail was truly a “Founding Mother.” Her letters to John are full of the homemaking rhythms of passion and practicality.  Her faith stood strong even in the midst of literal war: “The God of Israel is He that giveth strength and power unto his people,” she wrote, for which her husband called her a “heroine” and reassured her in Heaven’s hope that, “The worst that can happen, can do you no harm.”

Today, there is Kari Zeier, Montana state director for Concerned Women for America.  She models the redemption in a culture full of sexual confusion — showing the world it is still possible to love and be loved.  Kari was born in 1982, when abortion was very popular in this nation.  But Kari’s birth mother chose life and then adoption for her, a selfless decision for which Kari is profoundly grateful. Though her adopted family was loving, Kari was assaulted in high school, leading to tragic decisions such as drugs, alcohol, and promiscuity.  She got pregnant and chose to be a single mother to her daughter, whom she prophetically named Grace. She experienced a lot of God’s grace in the following years, when she met and married a loving husband with whom she had two more children.  As Kari says, “To have a husband who loves me and loves Grace as his own, that is only something God can orchestrate.”

Today, Kari is passionate about restoring a respect for family in a culture where it is devalued.  “We are losing our emphasis on family, we are seeing unwed mothers, and teenage pregnancies, and life being devalued,” she says. “Everything is so centered on stuff. It’s all about ME, instead of what I can give to my family.”  Kari feels that for both Ruth and herself, God aligned their desires with His desires for them, the result being the gift of joy and family.

Indeed, Ruth, Abigail, and Kari have a lot in common.  Devoting themselves to what some would consider “private life,” these women epitomized the truth that strong families are the building block of strong societies.  The devotion to family life has reverberating effects for generations.

 

 

CWA of MT State Director Kari Zeier: Will Gorsuch expose Senator Tester?

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We’ve all seen how furious the radical left is about losing the election. I can understand their frustrations. What I can’t understand is their mind-numbing push to denigrate anyone and anything even remotely associated with President Donald Trump, ignoring the particular merits of every situation.

President Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, Judge Neil Gorsuch, is the perfect example. By all accounts, this is a judge of impeccable character with the highest of qualifications. And he is being opposed by some in the Democratic leadership because of Trump.

Click here to read the entire op-ed as featured in the Missoulian.