Mississippi Conscience Protections Stand

Liberal tolerance is a farce. It doesn’t matter what rhetoric they use as long as the Court continues to treat sexual preferences as race and people of faith as bigots.

 

Back to Reality in 2018

Let us reject the smoke screens of this world with their false promises and hold on to what we know is truly real.

1
1

Legal Blurb Blog

Good Work on Judges Must Continue in 2018

By | LBB, Legal, News and Events | No Comments

The work on the confirmation of constitutional judges was by far the best news of 2017. Not only did we confirm an exemplary candidate in Justice Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court, but President Donald Trump also set the record for federal appellate court appointments in the first year of a presidency with 12. He also confirmed six impressive district court judges.

But the reality is that, though impressive, this is but a drop in the bucket coming out of the previous eight years of President Obama’s radical judges.

In his eight years in office, President Obama appointed a total of 334 judges.  He appointed two Supreme Court Justices, 55 appellate court judges, 268 district court judges, and nine others to lesser known court, like the Court of Federal Claims.

Recall that, as a pre-requisite, President Obama wanted judges who did not focus on the law but on empathy towards specific classes of people. This type of liberal judicial activism on such a big scale will not be easy to counteract. It most certainly won’t happen if the Senate loses focus and relents, instead of building on, the work they started in 2017.  Rest assured, the liberal side of the aisle will not relent on its obstruction of judicial nominations.

But given the Senate’s current makeup, and former Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s petulant rush to abolish the filibuster for judicial nominees, they should be able to overcome every obstructionist tactic thrown at them. Consistency and endurance will be the majority’s biggest challenge.

That’s where you and I can make a difference by remaining engaged and reminding our elected officials how important it is that they continue, and perhaps increase, the current pace on judicial nominations.  It is also important for us to consider this issue as elections for the U.S. Senate approach this November.

The good news is that, up until now, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) and Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) have shown no sign of fatigue.  Following up on their extraordinary work in 2017, they confirmed four more district judges last week, holding hearings for another four.

 

The Secret to MLK Jr.’s Hope

By | LBB, Legal, News and Events, Religious Issues | No Comments

It was a hope that captivated a nation. Still does. In classrooms all over America, the words of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, speech, “I Have a Dream,” still helps weave the dreams of many young minds. We all know (or should know) them by heart:

I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today. …

But Martin Luther King, Jr., experienced a dense social injustice that seemed insurmountable to many. Did you know that, according to the King Center, he was unjustly arrested 30 times? In Montgomery, Alabama, in 1956, he was arrested for driving 30 mph in a 25-mph zone.

Living under these circumstances, many had understandably become bitter. How did Martin Luther King, Jr., remain so hopeful? How did he keep his dream alive, as he was ridiculed, harassed, and systematically targeted because of the color of his skin?

The answer is in his name.  He was born Michael King, not Martin Luther, as he is known by all of us. His father, Michael King, Sr., pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia, changed his name, and that of his eldest son, to Martin Luther after he was inspired by the great protestant reformer on a trip to Germany.

So, the answer to Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, hope comes from his deep faith —a faith he most definitely received from his father, but which he embraced and acknowledged as the sustaining power of his entire effort.  Ironically, this is the part that is specifically and systematically ignored by our public schools and popular culture.

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, Christian faith contains the whole of his hope and effectiveness. To those who have experienced that faith, the fruits that flowed from such sufferings are of no surprise. The Apostle Paul wrote about it centuries before: “[W]e rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us,” (Romans 5: 3-4).

My wish on this Martin Luther King, Jr., Day 2018 (marking the 50ht anniversary of his assassination) is that we may re-discover the truths Dr. King knew so well. For, though we face our own sufferings, our own challenges, our own hope is still the same.  As the old Baptist hymn writer put it, “Jesus’ blood and righteousness.”

The miracle of the Christian faith is that our sufferings, through Christ, are nothing but gain. As His suffering and death on the cross brought us salvation, so, too, we can remain hopeful in the middle of whatever difficulty we face. That was the source of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, hope.

“All other ground is sinking sand.”

The Secret to MLK Jr.’s Hope

| LBB, Legal, News and Events, Religious Issues | No Comments

It was a hope that captivated a nation. Still does. In classrooms all over America, the words of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, speech, “I Have a Dream,” still helps weave…

Mississippi Conscience Protections Stand

| Legal, Marriage, Mississippi, News and Events | No Comments

This week, the United States Supreme Court declined to hear two cases (Barber v. Bryant and Campaign for Southern Equality v. Bryant ) challenging Mississippi’s “Protecting Freedom of Conscience from Government…

Back to Reality in 2018

| LBB, Legal, News and Events | No Comments

Strong sentiments about 2017 overwhelmed my social media feeds over the break. As with Dickens’ tale, it seems “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…

Capitol Hill Brief — A Supreme Accomplishment

| Blog, Capitol Hill Brief, Gorsuch, Legal, Religious Liberty, Sanctity of Life | No Comments

  Perhaps at the top of our list for accomplishments this year is the confirmation of Justice Neil Gorsuch to the United States Supreme Court.  God was so gracious to…

Christmas Celebrates the Unborn; We Should, Too

| Legal, News and Events, Sanctity of Life | No Comments

“In the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent from God to a city of Galilee named Nazareth, to a virgin betrothed to a man whose name was Joseph, of…

Better than the Twelve Days of Christmas

| Blog, Legal, News and Events | No Comments

The United States Senate has now confirmed the 12th circuit court judge under President Donald J. Trump. Just yesterday, they confirmed the nomination of James Ho to the Fifth Circuit…