Rape, Porn and the Treatment of Women

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How do you feel about a child rapist? How about men who surf porn? How about men who surf porn obsessively at work? Two news articles this week present a perspective that says these issues are all relative.

The first news story is about the recent arrest of Roman Polanski in Switzerland for past crimes committed in the United States.

On March 11, 1977, Mr. Polanski was arrested, and a California grand jury indicted him for furnishing Quaaludes to a minor, unlawful sexual intercourse, rape by use of drugs, oral copulation, and sodomy. On August 8, 1977, Mr. Polanski was convicted by plea of unlawful sexual intercourse, otherwise known as statutory rape. Before he could be sentenced for the crime to which he pled guilty, Mr. Polanski took the coward’s way out and fled the country. Fast-forward 30-plus years and he is in a Swiss jail awaiting extradition.

So how are some people reacting to his arrest for a rape? Many Hollywood luminaries, foreign government officials, diplomats, and dignitaries in other countries are outraged he is in jail. Evidently, the crime of raping a child is not nearly as insidious to them as holding an Academy award winning director, admitted rapist, and fugitive from justice accountable for his crimes.

Reading the trial testimony, the 13-year-old victim said “no” before she was raped, repeatedly. The 13-year-old victim said “no” before Mr. Polanski performed cunnilingus on her, or as she referred to it, “performing cuddliness.” The 13-year-old victim said “no” before he forced intercourse on her. The 13-year-old victim said “no” before he sodomized her.

“No” means “no” – except for people trying to excuse the behavior of a rapist they consider to be a Hollywood legend. We are being told the crime is over 30 years old and the victim has said she forgives him, so we should all move on as if the crime did not happen. Whoopi Goldberg on The View wanted to be careful that they didn’t accuse Mr. Polanski of “rape-rape” because they weren’t sure what he had been charged with in the original case. He was indicted for “rape-rape.” And more importantly, a victim does not forgive a crime that did not happen, and an innocent man does not plead out on a lesser charge.

Mr. Polanski raped a child and escaped punishment. Many rape victims carry lifelong emotional and sometimes physical scars from their ordeal. Advocating for letting a convicted rapist go free because he fled and then subsequently made some good movies sends a chilling message to rape victims.

The lesson, girls and ladies, is “be careful who rapes you” – some people are above the law or just too valuable to certain elements of society to serve time.

The second news item is an exclusive in the Washington Times. It seems the National Science Foundation has had a six-fold increase in employee misconduct investigations – many involving viewing pornography on government computers.

According to the paper, “[O]ne senior executive spent 331 days looking at pornography on his government computer and chatting online with nude or partially clad women.” What defense did he offer? He went with the “humanitarian” approach. Investigators wrote, “He explained that these young women are from poor countries and need to make money to help their parents, and this site helps them do that.”

The article says, “Foundation spokeswoman Dana Topousis said officials have enacted more rigorous computer training and tightened controls to filter out inappropriate Internet addresses from the sites employees can access from their work computers.”

How about training them that women are not sex objects to be ogled or commodities to be purchased? Or educating them about the facts of sex trafficking and prostitution? Facts such as: the average age of entry into prostitution in the United States is 13 years old; a 13-year-old in prostitution is a victim of sex trafficking; victims of sex trafficking are found in pornography; pimps and sex traffickers use pornography to show their victims what they are expected to do to johns who buy them.

How has our society devolved to a point where people defend a child rapist and others are perfectly comfortable accessing pornography at work? The answer is moral relativism, and it is ruining our society.

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