Porn Viewing in Public: Have You No Shame?

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ipodview.jpgThe Washington Post recently reported on the prevalence of pornography in public places. They wrote about people subjected to what porn viewers are watching in the adjoining seat on a plane and on the Metro. They mentioned someone stuck in a traffic jam behind an SUV whose owner was playing porn on the vehicle’s DVD player. There was a story about a man watching porn on his cell phone while at an NBA game.

Porn viewing used to be something people did in secret – they did not want their friends, families and fellow citizens to know. Today, not only are people unashamed, they are so self-absorbed and desensitized to porn’s effect, they do not care that they inflict their aberrant viewing habits on those around them.

That’s right, aberrant. When people hear the word “porn,” most think of Playboy and the centerfold feature. However, today’s porn goes way beyond that. Urinating and defecating on people is part of today’s porn. Multiple men ejaculating on a woman’s face at the same time is today’s porn. Women stepping on and crushing small animals in bare feet or heels is today’s porn. And then there is the sickest, most depraved form of all: child porn.

Some of the people in the article think public porn viewing is no big deal. Would they change their mind if they were sitting next to someone watching the porn described in the preceding paragraph? Would they change their mind if their younger sibling, their child, or their mother was with them?

Would people reject viewing porn if they understood that it is addictive and it desensitizes the brain so that what once titillated no longer does and something more depraved must be sought to bring arousal? That is how some people go from viewing adult porn to viewing child porn. Would people think differently about those who view porn if the porn viewer were their boss, their children’s teacher, or the doctor examining them?

Our culture glamorizes porn. Former Porn Actress Shelley Lubben has established The Pink Cross Foundation to help actors leave the porn industry and educate the public about the harms of porn. Her website, www.thepinkcross.org, has a section of testimonies from former porn stars. The following posts show how these former stars describe the “glamour” of porn.

Shelley Lubben: “As we continue to traumatize ourselves by making more adult films, we use more and more drugs and alcohol. We live in constant fear of catching AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. Every time there’s an HIV scare, we race to the nearest clinic for an emergency checkup. Pornographers insist on giving viewers the fantasy sex they demand, all the while sacrificing the very ones who make it happen. In other words, no condoms allowed. Herpes, gonorrhea, syphilis, chlamydia and other diseases are the normal anxieties we walk around with daily.”

Former Porn Star Sierra Sinn: “The scenes you see in porn aren’t fun at all, and certainly doesn’t fee [sic] good at all. You just d [sic] it. They don’t care about no matter how big in porn you are. To be blunt, shooting a scene is not easy for the girls. It’s not enjoyable. It’s not a great time. Girls are getting hurt. It’s emotionally and physically trying. If you knew what people were going through, you wuldn’t [sic] like it as much. You wuldn’t [sic] watch it if you had to see everything. It’s just brutal sex t [sic] make porn companies rich.”

Former Porn Star Veronica Lain: “Porn was not ‘glamorous’ though. I definitely did some things I did not want to do. I saw girls gagged and choked on the set during filming. I was one of those girls who was gagged and choked. I also saw empty douches and enema boxes laying around. I also met women who couldn’t work because of STDs.”

Former Porn Star Erin Moore: “When I was shooting, I was blocking all emotion, and it was effecting [sic] my personal relationships with everyone. I had no ‘real’ sex life and was showed no affection because I was used to doing the motions of something fake.”

Former Porn Star Ashley Brooks: “Every film that I made was a total and complete lie. I put up a real good front, but the truth was, I despised having sex.”

Porn is harmful to those who view it, those who make it, and those who have family members, friends, neighbors, and co-workers who are addicted to it. People viewing porn in public should not be met with acceptance; they need help. If they are viewing porn in public, they have lost all respect for themselves, others, common courtesy, and decency.

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