Congress Should Oppose Any Legislative, Administrative, or Judicial Effort to Repeal, Undermine, or Suspend Enforcement of the 1993 Law RE: Homosexuals in the Military

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Conservative Action Project

Edwin Meese III, former Attorney General
Gen. C. A. Horner, USAF (Ret.)
Elaine Donnelly, President, Center for Military Readiness
Gen. Frederick J. Kroesen, USA (Ret.)
Frank J. Gaffney, President, Center for Security Policy
Gen. Robert Magnus, USMC (Ret.)
Phyllis Schlafly, Founder & President, Eagle Forum
Gen. Carl W. Stiner, USA (Ret.)
David Keene, Chairman, American Conservative Union
Gen. Joseph J. Went, USMC (Ret.)
Wendy Wright, President, Concerned Women for America
Adm. Jerome L. Johnson, USN (Ret.)
Tony Perkins, President, Family Research Council
Adm. Leighton W. Smith, USN (Ret.)
Andrea Lafferty, Executive Director, Traditional Values Coalition
Lt. Gen. Jan C. Huly, USMC (Ret.)
Mathew D. Staver, Founder & Chairman, Liberty Counsel
Lt. Gen. E.G. Shuler, Jr., USAF (Ret.)
J. Kenneth Blackwell, former U.S. Ambassador, UN Human Rights Commission
Colin Hanna, President, Let Freedom Ring
Susan Carleson, Chairman & CEO, American Civil Rights Union
Herman Cain, President, THE New Voice Inc.
Richard Viguerie, Chairman, ConservativeHQ.com
Jim Martin, Chairman, 60 Plus Association
Alfred Regnery, Publisher, American Spectator
Rev. Louis P. Sheldon, Chairman, Traditional Values Coalition
Marion Edwyn Harrison, Past President, Free Congress Foundation
Brent Bozell, President, Media Research Center
Becky Norton Dunlop, former Deputy Assistant to President Reagan for Presidential Personnel

MEMO FOR THE MOVEMENT

Congress Should Oppose Any Legislative, Administrative, or Judicial Effort to Repeal, Undermine, or Suspend Enforcement of the 1993 Law re: Homosexuals in the Military (Section 654, Title 10, U.S.C, usually referred to as “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”)

RE: On April 30, the Department of Defense released a letter from Secretary Robert Gates and Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen strongly opposing any legislative action on the 1993 law regarding homosexuals in the military, including repeal or suspension of enforcement, in the year 2010. Noting that a Pentagon review of the issue is in progress, the strongly-worded Gates/Mullen letter warned that any legislative action this year would send “a very damaging message to our men and women in uniform.”

ACTION: We urge you to speak out in opposition to any legislative attempt to repeal or suspend enforcement of the 1993 law regarding homosexuals in the military (Section 654, Title 10). Members of Congress should respect the opinions of current and retired military leaders, and the voices of volunteer men and women need to be heard. Congress should not rush to take any action that would have a negative impact on military readiness and unit cohesion.

ISSUE IN BRIEF: In 1993, a Democrat controlled Congress approved and President Clinton signed the law regarding homosexuals in the military, usually referred to as “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” with bipartisan veto-proof majorities. Federal courts have upheld the constitutionality of the law (Section 654, Title 10, U.S.C.) several times. For reasons summarized below, Congress should reject any legislation to repeal or suspend enforcement of the current statute:

U.S. Military should not be used for social engineering. Any change in policy will only consume time and financial resources that could be spent on other aspects of the military’s mission.

Military leaders support current law. To date, 1,167 retired Flag & General Officers for the Military, 51 of them former 4-stars, have personally signed a formal statement endorsing the current law (Section 654, Title 10).

No case for overturning the current law. This issue is not a priority for Americans or members of the military. Given the dual engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan, there is no need to interrupt a policy to which military members are accustomed.

Family housing and benefits. Military family housing would include same-sex couples, increasing pressures for repeal of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). Declining family retention would leave fewer, less skilled troops to face more deployments and potential combat.

Voluntary personnel losses. Many personnel would not complain of problems, even in cases of assault or abuse of rank, due to fear of career penalties and questions about their own “attitudes.” They will simply decline reenlistment. Potential recruits will avoid the military.

Increased misconduct, both consensual and nonconsensual. Because human beings are not perfect, male/male and female/female incidents, in addition to problems already occurring, are predictable. Unit commanders will be burdened with personnel turmoil, accusations of bias, and potential career penalties that have the effect of weakening trust and team cohesion.

Involuntary personnel losses and “zero tolerance” of dissent. Assigning special status to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals would impose a corollary “zero tolerance” policy, requiring denial of promotions and other career-ending penalties for anyone who disagrees for any reason, starting with chaplains and personnel of most major faiths. Chaplains would be censored in their preaching.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON OPPOSITION TO OVERTURNING THE CURRENT LAW AND POLICY ON “DON’T ASK, DON’T TELL,” PLEASE VISIT THESE WEBSITES:

To date, 1,167 retired Flag & General Officers for the Military, 51 of them former 4-stars, have personally signed a formal statement endorsing the current law (Section 654, Title 10).
Peter Sprigg, Family Research Council: Sex Matters in the Military
CMR Policy Analysis: Consequences of the Proposed New LGBT Law for the Military
Maj. Gen. Patrick Brady, USA (Ret.): Don’t Stress the Military With Quad-Sexual Units (Maj. Gen. Brady was awarded the Medal of Honor for his service in Vietnam.)
CMR Policy Analysis: False National Security Argument for Gays in the Military
CMR Policy Analysis: Foreign Nations That Accommodate Homosexuals in Their Militaries Are Not Role Models for the U.S.
Air Force University Press, May 2010, Attitudes Aren’t Free: Thinking Deeply About Diversity in the U.S. Armed Forces, chapter by CMR President Elaine Donnelly titled “Defending the Culture of the Military,” pp. 249-292.
CMR Summary: Ten Reasons To Oppose the “LGBT Law” for the Military
Gary McCaleb and Jordan Lorence, Alliance Defense Fund: Change in Military Policy on Homosexual Behavior Could Affect Chaplains
Frank Gaffney, Center for Security Policy: “Hail to the Chiefs”
Bob Maginnis, Human Events: Gay Review and Combat Effectiveness
General Carl E. Mundy, Jr., Washington Times: Maintain Military Gay Ban
Robert Knight, Coral Ridge Ministries: Don’t Ask Who They Are But What They Do
Jane Chastain: Our Military Needs Your Help

(All organizations listed are for identification purposes only)

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