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Capitol Hill Brief — Inappropriate Ginsburg

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Here’s something we won’t hear from Judge Neil Gorsuch on the Supreme Court: more political commentary, like the continuously inappropriate comments of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

In her latest, she tells the BBC that, “A great man once said that the true symbol of the United States … is the pendulum, and when the pendulum swings too far in one direction, it will swing back.”

She said that because she’s not happy with President Donald Trump and now she wants the international community to know that he will not be in power forever.

How shameful from a sitting Supreme Court Justice.  We should be thankful Neil Gorsuch is not set to follow in her footsteps.


Our next Supreme Court justice will shape America’s future for generations to come. Judge Neil Gorsuch will uphold conservative, constitutional values. Tell the Senate to confirm him by signing our petition at www.CapitolHillBrief.org today. If you’d like to hear these commentaries on the radio, find me on your local radio station.

 

Capitol Hill Brief — CWA is Your Voice Around the Nation

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Concerned Women for America is your voice around the nation on issues you care about.  Recently, we have been speaking on behalf of Neil Gorsuch’s nomination to the Supreme Court.  Here is CWA’s Communications Coordinator Janae Stracke at a recent town hall meeting:

[AUDIO CLIP] Janae Stracke: It isn’t about the issues, which is what a lot of the people are talking about. The point is that he will rule on the law and not be creating legislation. … He was confirmed to the 10th Circuit Court without opposition, and I find it hard to believe that a judge who was appointed without opposition before would have a hard time now.

Your support is what makes this possible, so I want to thank you!


Our next Supreme Court justice will shape America’s future for generations to come. Judge Neil Gorsuch will uphold conservative, constitutional values. Tell the Senate to confirm him by signing our petition at www.CapitolHillBrief.org today. If you’d like to hear these commentaries on the radio, find me on your local radio station.

 

Capitol Hill Brief — CWA of Maine Stands for Gorsuch

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Concerned Women for America of Maine state director Penny Morrell stood up for the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court at a recent town hall meeting hosted by Sen. King.  Here is what she said:

[AUDIO CLIP] Penny Morrell: Thank you, Senator King. My name is Penny Morrell. I’m state director for Concerned Women for America of Maine. Thank you for having this forum tonight. I would urge you to confirm Judge Neil Gorsuch for the Supreme Court because he is a strict constitutionalist. And it is not the job of the Supreme Court to make law; it is the job of the Supreme Court to be sure that any law is subject to the constitution as originally written.


Our next Supreme Court justice will shape America’s future for generations to come. Judge Neil Gorsuch will uphold conservative, constitutional values. Tell the Senate to confirm him by signing our petition at www.CapitolHillBrief.org today. If you’d like to hear these commentaries on the radio, find me on your local radio station.

 

Concerned Women Through History: National Sovereignty — Deborah, Joan of Arc, and Bev Ehlen

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There is a deep valor in standing up for one’s own nation.  Believing in a nation’s sovereignty literally means believing in the state’s right to “self-govern.”  It is the patriotism that protects one’s own nation against those who seek to oppress or destroy it.

We could, at first, think national sovereignty has more to do with men.  Men are often in governing positions; men are often the ones on the battlefield. We are told by the left that women care mostly about “women’s issues” like reproductive “freedom.”  But this worldview misses a long legacy of women who are deeply involved in their country’s governing and protection.

Deborah, the Bible’s only female judge, was so important to Israel’s history that she was known as the “Mother of Israel.” She was a judge in the land, an amazing civic responsibility, but she became concerned that the Israelite people had been so long enslaved by the king of Canaan and his army commander Sisera. Deborah knew God was calling Israel’s army, led by Barak, to come against Sisera.  She was brave enough to demand that Barak follow God’s call and brave enough to accompany him.  Yet she was humble enough to not be the head of the army herself, and to share in the victory with another woman — Jael — who slew Sisera with her tent peg!  It’s a remarkable story (read more in Judges 4 & 5) about protecting one’s nation.

Then there is Joan of Arc whose love for France led her to a battle of her own.  Born a poor shepherd girl, she felt directly called by God to defend France from English oppression.  In chapter one of his book, 7 Women, Eric Metaxas tells of the situation France faced: “It was not unusual for English soldiers to march into French villages, killing civilians, burning homes, and stealing crops and cattle.” This situation called Joan out of her comfort zone and into great acts of bravery: “Although I would rather have remained spinning at my mother’s side,” she said, “yet must I go and must I do this thing, for my Lord wills that I do so.” Her sacrifices eventually led to victory and the restoration of the King of France before her own capture and trial.  Her ultimate martyrdom speaks highly of her commitment to God and country at all costs.

Whilst Deborah was “Mother of Israel,” Joan was “The Maid of Orleans.”  Whether married or single, whether judging the laws or leading the troops, whether Israel or France, Deborah and Joan protected national sovereignty. They are an inspiration for concerned women who wish to protect America today.

In today’s world, women like Bev Ehlen protect America by educating our leaders, so that the loyalty of those leaders to America can grow against any internal or external threat.

Bev is standing up for America by working on the ground to educate individuals across Missouri regarding the Christian history and foundation of our country. Because of Bev’s work, each member of the Missouri General Assembly (MOGA) is given a copy of The Five Thousand Year Leap when they take office, which explains the twenty eight principles that the Founders used to create our republic and write our U.S. Constitution.  Bev believes that protecting America requires renewed commitment to these principles and to the governing structure of federalism where each sovereign state makes up a wonderful sovereign nation.

In what way might God be calling you to protect America today?

 

Capitol Hill Brief — Bill O’Reilly and a Day without Women

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The so-called “day without women” was a poor representation of what womanhood is all about.  I was glad to be your voice in a variety of national media shows for the past week to express our fundamental disagreement with this form of radical feminism.  Here is a clip from my appearance on Bill O’Reilly on Fox News:

[Audio Clip] Penny Nance: This message is so wrong; it should be the opposite. You don’t make the board room by staying home and pouting. We have told women, “Go to work and kill it today. That is how you become CEO.”

[Audio Clip] Bill O’Reilly: Alright. Are you disenchanted with America, because more women aren’t leading in certain industries?

[Audio Clip] Penny Nance: No. We have more opportunity than anywhere in the world.

[Audio Clip] Bill O’Reilly: Alright, so you’re optimistic.

[Audio Clip] Penny Nance: Very optimistic.


Our next Supreme Court justice will shape America’s future for generations to come. Judge Neil Gorsuch will uphold conservative, constitutional values. Tell the Senate to confirm him by signing our petition at www.CapitolHillBrief.org today. If you’d like to hear these commentaries on the radio, find me on your local radio station.

 

 

Capitol Hill Brief — Good News on Transgender Bathrooms Issue

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Here’s a headline you don’t hear every day: “The Supreme Court did the right thing.”

After the Trump Administration wisely rescinded President Obama’s transgender bathroom mandate, the U.S. Supreme Court has vacated and remanded a case dealing with the issue back to the lower court.

That’s great news because it means that a lower court’s erroneous ruling forcing a Virginia school to open restrooms beyond biological sex is no longer valid and no school is bound by it.

Let us pray the lower court does the right thing now and protects the rights and safety of all students — not just the few that our culture deems worthy.  Our young women deserve no less.


Our next Supreme Court justice will shape America’s future for generations to come. Judge Neil Gorsuch will uphold conservative, constitutional values. Tell the Senate to confirm him by signing our petition at www.CapitolHillBrief.org today. If you’d like to hear these commentaries on the radio, find me on your local radio station.

Concerned Women Through History: Religious Liberty — Miriam, Anne Hutchinson, and Tanya Ditty

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Freedom.  It’s something for which every human heart longs.  That opportunity to connect with God and seek Him.  Women throughout history have taught the world something about the need for freedom.

Miriam, from the book of Exodus, helped her brother Moses lead their nation out of slavery into freedom.  Retellings of this epic story often leave out that Israel’s freedom was fundamentally tied to the Israelites need to freely worship God which they were not allowed to do in Egypt: “Then say to [Pharoah], ‘The LORD, the God of the Hebrews, has sent me to say to you: Let My people go, so that they may worship Me in the wilderness. But until now you have not listened,’” (Exodus 7:16).  Israel’s Exodus reminds us that the freedom of nations is tied to the freedom of religion; one begets the other.

And God’s people, once free from Egypt’s grasp, had to make a conscious, willful decision to follow God.  Their religious freedom allowed them to choose rightly or wrongly: “But if serving the LORD seems undesirable to you, then choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve, whether the gods your ancestors served beyond the Euphrates, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land you are living. But as for me and my household, we will serve the LORD,” (Joshua 24:15).

Likewise in America, people must choose whether to follow God, and be free and unhindered to do so according to their conscience.  In the early days of the colonies, Anne Hutchinson fought for our nation to be one founded on the principle of religious freedom, not one particular sect or denomination against others. In what would become the nation of “E Pluribus Unum (Out of Many, One),” Ann was ahead of her time in respecting conscience.  After her own specific religious beliefs lead her to part with the majority religion, she moved to Rhode Island and helped establish freedom of religion there.  She was laying the groundwork for what would become a great American value outlined in the eloquent words of the Bill of Rights: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”

And today it’s Concerned Women for America of Georgia State Director Tanya Ditty who carries on this American legacy of religious freedom. She has stood up for our fundamental right to freedom of conscience — the right to think and believe what we want without fear of punishment.  She has fought tirelessly for religious freedom legislation in Georgia that ensures broad-based religious protections for all its citizens. She had this to say about the importance of religious freedom: “It is the bedrock of all liberty, and it must be protected now for the sake of the generations that come behind us.”

Blessings for future generations are such an important concept to America.  Ask God how you can be a part of ensuring a legacy of religious freedom in America.

 

Concerned Women Through History: Education – Eunice, Septima Clark, and Jill Noble

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Eunice is one of the lesser known women of the Bible.  She’s referenced twice, once in Acts and once in Paul’s letter to Timothy.

2 Timothy 1:5 states: “I have been reminded of your sincere faith, which first lived in your grandmother Lois and in your mother Eunice and, I am persuaded, now lives in you also.” This passage helps us connect with the humanity of Paul and Timothy as they discuss common relationships and admire educational achievements.

It is Timothy’s mother, and her mother before her, who set the young leader on a good path.  We learn here that education and the family are linked.  We are reminded that spiritual maturity — learning the ways of God in our life — begins at home and extends out to an entire community.

Furthermore, we know from Acts 16:1 that Eunice was married to an unbeliever.  So she managed to raise her son in the faith, despite what could have been opposition and marital tension.  Eunice’s name means “victory.”  Indeed, Timothy’s faith was a great victory not only for Eunice, but meant great victories in the church — both historically and today.

What Eunice did for the church, Septima did for her race.  Septima Poinsette Clark’s husband died tragically shortly after their marriage, so, like Eunice, she had to forge her own advocacy.  She was African-American and spent her life making sure African-Americans received proper education and civil rights.  She was a teacher who lost her job for her desire to work in the NAACP.

And in 1961, she joined the Southern Christian Leadership Conference as director of education and teaching, helping to create over 800 schools. 

Jill Noble, the Greater Kansas City area director for Concerned Women for America, also knows education is a tool for empowerment.  In her home state of Missouri, she fought Common Core curriculums, which were putting local needs aside and reducing intelligence standards to the lowest common denominator.

Her deep passion for education comes from a deep awareness of its divine origin.  As she puts it:

“We always need to remember that it was God Himself who created the ability to transfer a grapheme symbol to represent a spoken word.  There is great power in this technology that we call ‘reading.’  It was designed from the beginning to educate God’s people out of slavery into a holy nation. We saw that in the giving of the Ten Commandments and, ultimately, in the giving of the entire Word of God.  It was and is entirely designed to educate the human race in all areas of life.  Today, education is under assault in large part because liberal policies cannot easily control an educated population.  And so we continue to educate our children and ourselves in order to uphold the precepts of God, as well as the Constitution of the United States of America.”

These women understand the reverberating effects of education — on a church, for a race, and in a nation. We admire them as heroines who know the next generation needs our care.

 

Concerned Women Through History: Family — Ruth, Abigail Adams, and Kari Zeier

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Ruth.  She was a Moabite — a nation that only existed because of the rape and incest of Lot’s daughters with their father.  Thus there was political hostility between her race and Israel.  And in her personal life, she’d already been through so much.  Her father-in-law had died.  Her husband had died.  Her first marriage had been infertile.

Looking at this, it is hard to believe she was destined to be the family woman of the Bible!

But she is.  She stuck by Naomi — her mother-in-law, a woman of a different race, age, and religion — knitting herself to her with fierce commitment.  Giving up her homeland’s gods, she embraced Judaism.  She bravely gleaned food for her and her mother-in-law and humbly accepted Boaz’s help and protection, while boldly reminding him of his further duties as her kinsman redeemer and eventually becoming his wife.  And she bore the grandfather of David, in the very lineage of Christ.

Then there is Abigail Adams.  In many ways, she was the woman behind American independence.  Farmer, supportive wife, community organizer, and fiercely faithful to God, Abigail was truly a “Founding Mother.” Her letters to John are full of the homemaking rhythms of passion and practicality.  Her faith stood strong even in the midst of literal war: “The God of Israel is He that giveth strength and power unto his people,” she wrote, for which her husband called her a “heroine” and reassured her in Heaven’s hope that, “The worst that can happen, can do you no harm.”

Today, there is Kari Zeier, Montana state director for Concerned Women for America.  She models the redemption in a culture full of sexual confusion — showing the world it is still possible to love and be loved.  Kari was born in 1982, when abortion was very popular in this nation.  But Kari’s birth mother chose life and then adoption for her, a selfless decision for which Kari is profoundly grateful. Though her adopted family was loving, Kari was assaulted in high school, leading to tragic decisions such as drugs, alcohol, and promiscuity.  She got pregnant and chose to be a single mother to her daughter, whom she prophetically named Grace. She experienced a lot of God’s grace in the following years, when she met and married a loving husband with whom she had two more children.  As Kari says, “To have a husband who loves me and loves Grace as his own, that is only something God can orchestrate.”

Today, Kari is passionate about restoring a respect for family in a culture where it is devalued.  “We are losing our emphasis on family, we are seeing unwed mothers, and teenage pregnancies, and life being devalued,” she says. “Everything is so centered on stuff. It’s all about ME, instead of what I can give to my family.”  Kari feels that for both Ruth and herself, God aligned their desires with His desires for them, the result being the gift of joy and family.

Indeed, Ruth, Abigail, and Kari have a lot in common.  Devoting themselves to what some would consider “private life,” these women epitomized the truth that strong families are the building block of strong societies.  The devotion to family life has reverberating effects for generations.

 

 

Capitol Hill Brief — The Democrats’ Conundrum

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The Democrats’ conundrum when it comes to the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court was put succinctly by one of his home-state papers, The Colorado Springs Gazette, which joined the Denver Post in urging Democratic Senator Michael Bennet to support the well-qualified nominee.  The paper’s editorial board wrote this:

If Bennet wants to show more unwavering loyalty to the Democratic Party, he will do as requested by minority leadership. If he wants to do right by Colorado, he will make Gorsuch the only Coloradan on the Supreme Court since Byron “Whizzer” White.

That’s the question facing every Democrat.  Will they do right by the American people and support Judge Gorsuch, or will they put party loyalty above their constituents?


Our next Supreme Court justice will shape America’s future for generations to come. Judge Neil Gorsuch will uphold conservative, constitutional values. Tell the Senate to confirm him by signing our petition at www.CapitolHillBrief.org today. If you’d like to hear these commentaries on the radio, find me on your local radio station.